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How Does FDI Affect Performance at Home? An Activity-level Analysis for Japanese Electrical Machinery and Electronics Firms


  • Toshiyuki Matsuura

    (The Institute for Economic and Industrial Studies, Keio University, Japan)

  • Kazuyuki Motohashi

    (Department of Technology Management for Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan; Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan)

  • Kazunobu Hayakawa

    (Inter-Disciplinary Studies Center, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan; Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan)


Focusing on firms from the electrical machinery and electronics industry, this paper investigates the impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) on home productivity using activity-level data rather than, as most previous studies have done, firm-level data. Distinguishing between horizontal and vertical FDI (HFDI and VFDI), it is argued that VFDI changes the activities that firms are engaged in at home after the relocation of production, altering firms' production function. This means that a direct comparison of productivity at the firm-level before and after the relocation of production is inappropriate. Instead, in order to assess the impact of FDI on home productivity, it is necessary to use activity-level data. Doing so, we obtain results that are consistent with theoretical predictions: HFDI does not necessarily have a significant positive effect on home productivity in activities that parallel those conducted by affiliates abroad. On the other hand, VFDI significantly enhances productivity in activities that have an input-output relationship with the activity relocated abroad.

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  • Toshiyuki Matsuura & Kazuyuki Motohashi & Kazunobu Hayakawa, 2009. "How Does FDI Affect Performance at Home? An Activity-level Analysis for Japanese Electrical Machinery and Electronics Firms," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2009-002, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
  • Handle: RePEc:kei:dpaper:2009-002

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    Cited by:

    1. Ralph Paprzycki & Keiko Ito, 2010. "Investment, Production and Trade Networks as Drivers of East Asian Integration," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-117, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

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