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Low workforce participation of educated female and the role of work organizations in post-war Sri Lanka

Author

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  • Dissanayake, Kumudinei

Abstract

Sri Lanka as a developing economy that achieved gender equity in education and a higher literacy rate (both adult and youth) in the South Asian region still records a low labor force participation and high unemployment rate of females when compared to their male counterparts. With the suggestion of existing literature on the non-conventional models of careers those adopted by young and female populations at the working age, this paper discusses the role of work organizations in absorbing more females (and even minority groups) into the workforce. It mainly focuses on the need of designing appropriate human resource strategies and reforming the existing organizational structures in order for contributing to the national development in the post-war Sri Lanka economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Dissanayake, Kumudinei, 2011. "Low workforce participation of educated female and the role of work organizations in post-war Sri Lanka," IDE Discussion Papers 307, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper307
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sri Lanka; Female labor; Labor market; Labor policy; Work force; Female; Educated; Work organization; Role; Non-conventional models of career;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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