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Technology Choice in the IT Industry and Changes of the Trade Structure


  • Yoshino, Hisao


In the IT industry, there has been a remarkable increase in the demand forsystem LSI. A system LSI must be produced, tailor-designed for each electricalappliance. It is said that this production method has made the IC cycle ambiguous inrecent years. It can be sought that the choice of whether the economy pursues adevelopment path centering on technology which is tradable or technology which isembodied in labor, depends on the historical background. The relationship betweenthese two types of technologies is changing rapidly every one or two years. In thisbackground, the analysis is focused on the new trend of technology. In the section 2,the newest trend of technology in the field of system LSI is explained. Then, whichkind of technology will be developed and how it will have an affect in the nearfuture, is considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoshino, Hisao, 2009. "Technology Choice in the IT Industry and Changes of the Trade Structure," IDE Discussion Papers 191, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  • Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper191

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nicholas Bloom & Mirko Draca & John Van Reenen, 2016. "Trade Induced Technical Change? The Impact of Chinese Imports on Innovation, IT and Productivity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(1), pages 87-117.
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    6. Glaeser, Edward L & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1126-1152, December.
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    8. Jonathan M. Karpoff, 2001. "Public versus Private Initiative in Arctic Exploration: The Effects of Incentives and Organizational Structure," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(1), pages 38-78, February.
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    10. Brambilla, Irene, 2009. "Multinationals, technology, and the introduction of varieties of goods," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 89-101, September.
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    More about this item


    Technology Choice; IT industry; Trade Structure; System LSI; Information technology; Information services industry;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • L63 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Microelectronics; Computers; Communications Equipment
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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