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New Mover Studies: Six Southwest Counties


  • Burke, Sandra Charvat
  • Edelman, Mark


This study highlights the experiences of people who have recently moved to or from six southwest counties in Iowa. This report summarizes details about reasons for moving, community satisfaction, sources of information, age, education, housing, and income of the respondents. The purpose is to increase understanding about why people move so community leaders and citizens can develop actionable strategies for attracting and retaining population.

Suggested Citation

  • Burke, Sandra Charvat & Edelman, Mark, 2009. "New Mover Studies: Six Southwest Counties," Staff General Research Papers Archive 31433, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:31433

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Margaret McMillan & Dani Rodrik & Karen Horn Welch, 2002. "When Economic Reform Goes Wrong: Cashews in Mozambique," NBER Working Papers 9117, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Richard J. Sexton & Ian Sheldon & Steve McCorriston & Humei Wang, 2007. "Agricultural trade liberalization and economic development: the role of downstream market power," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 36(2), pages 253-270, March.
    3. Wilcox, Michael D. & Abbott, Philip C., 2004. "Market Power and Structural Adjustment: The Case of West African Cocoa Market Liberalization," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20084, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Byeong-Il Ahn & Hyunok Lee, 2010. "An equilibrium displacement approach to oligopoly market analysis: an application to trade in the Korean infant formula market," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 101-109, March.
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    population; migration; labor migration; net migration;

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