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Belastet die Inflation verschiedene Haushaltstypen in Deutschland unterschiedlich stark?

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  • Silke Tober

    () (IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation)

Abstract

When the prices of important goods such as energy and food greatly increase, the ques-tion arises whether the impact on the various income groups differs. An analysis of the structure of consumption expenditure of different household groups does not yield significant differences in the effect of the surge in energy and food prices: the household-specific inflation rates are quite similar. It does not follow, however, that households across income groups are affected by the price increase to the same degree: Low-income households are more affected in the sense that they may actually have to con-sume less given their high consumption ratio and lack of wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Silke Tober, 2008. "Belastet die Inflation verschiedene Haushaltstypen in Deutschland unterschiedlich stark?," IMK Working Paper 17-2008, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:imk:wpaper:17-2008
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    File URL: http://www.boeckler.de/pdf/p_imk_wp_17_2008.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerhard Fenz, 2013. "Austrian Economy to Grow by 0.5% in 2013," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 3, pages 6-11.

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