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Labor Market Search, Housing Prices and Borrowing Constraints


  • Javier Andrés Domingo

    () (University of Valencia, Spain)

  • José Emilio Boscá

    () (University of Valencia, Spain)

  • Javier Ferri

    () (University of Valencia, Spain)


Mortgage market deregulation in the early 1980s coincided in time with a sharp break in the cyclical behavior of many variables related to housing and to the labor market. This paper analyses the joint dynamics of labor market variables, output and housing prices in a search model with efficient bargaining and financial frictions. In a setting of household heterogeneity, only mortgaged-backed loans are available for impatient households, whose borrowing cannot exceed a proportion of the expected value of their real estate holdings. This feature of the credit market, together with search and matching frictions in the labor market, establish a strong link between credit constraints and consumption that significantly affects labor market outcomes: hours, wages and vacancies. The model is also able to explain the comovements of housing prices with output, productive investment and consumption. Our analysis confirms that the response of labor market variables to technology shocks has been substantially affected by the changes in the nature and tightness of imperfections in credit markets that occurred in the early 1980s. Allowing for a housing price shock, in addition to the technology shock, the model is also able to explain the observed reduction in the correlation of housing prices with both output and private investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Javier Andrés Domingo & José Emilio Boscá & Javier Ferri, 2010. "Labor Market Search, Housing Prices and Borrowing Constraints," Working Papers 1001, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
  • Handle: RePEc:iei:wpaper:1001

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Huang, Ho-Chuan (River) & Lin, Shu-Chin, 2008. "Smooth-time-varying Okun's coefficients," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 363-375, March.
    2. Jose Emilio Boscá & Rafael Domenech & Javier Ferri, 2008. "Tax Reforms and Labour-market Performance: An Evaluation for Spain using REMS," Working Papers 0804, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.
    3. J. Boscá & A. Díaz & R. Doménech & J. Ferri & E. Pérez & L. Puch, 2010. "A rational expectations model for simulation and policy evaluation of the Spanish economy," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 135-169, March.
    4. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2008. "The Role of Labor Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth," NBER Working Papers 13840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Pietro Garibaldi & Paolo Mauro, 2002. "Anatomy of employment growth," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(34), pages 67-114, April.
    6. Diego Romero-Avila & Carlos Usabiaga, 2007. "Unit root tests and persistence of unemployment: Spain vs. the United States," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 457-461.
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    More about this item


    general equilibrium; borrowing constraints; search frictions; housing prices;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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