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When Should Developing Countries Announce Their Climate Policy?

Author

Listed:
  • Jorge Fernandez
  • Sebastian Miller

    ()

Abstract

This paper provides a rationale for developing countries to announce future credible commitments to reduce GHG emissions even if these are not to materialize in the short run, and for domestic reasons only. A simple framework is presented in which it is shown that it may be costly for an economy to transition from high to low emissions; and that, if climate policy eventually will be enacted, then it may be better for countries to commit earlier and therefore eliminate the uncertainty for the private sector to invest appropriately in clean technologies. In particular, conditions are shown under which the private investor prefers a pre-announced climate policy, and how this policy affects investment decisions and the deployment of clean technologies.

Suggested Citation

  • Jorge Fernandez & Sebastian Miller, 2011. "When Should Developing Countries Announce Their Climate Policy?," Research Department Publications 4755, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4755
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shalizi, Zmarak & Lecocq, Franck, 2009. "Climate change and the economics of targeted mitigation in sectors with long-lived capital stock," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5063, The World Bank.
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    13. repec:idb:brikps:42058 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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