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Construyendo capacidades institucionales para implementar PDP: El caso de las políticas de promoción del diseño en la Argentina

Author

Listed:
  • Mariana Chudnovsky
  • Andrea González
  • Juan Carlos Hallak
  • Mercedes Sidders

Abstract

Dentro del amplio espectro de las políticas públicas de promoción del desarrollo productivo (PDP), este trabajo se concentra en las políticas de “promoción del diseño”, que conciben al diseño como una herramienta para la innovación, diferenciación y competitividad. Se estudiaron las principales agencias estatales encargadas de las PDP de diseño en el gobierno nacional y en la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (CABA). Algunos de los hallazgos principales del trabajo señalan que contar con infraestructura y/o presupuesto no siempre alcanza para contar con la capacidad de implementar políticas. La flexibilidad organizacional aparece como un elemento clave, sobre todo cuando se combina con la estabilidad contractual de esas personas que cuentan con el conocimiento necesario sobre el tema. Asimismo, se observa que estos dos últimos aspectos florecen cuando existe cierto "aislamiento" de los shocks políticos externos, ligados a la inestabilidad y volatilidad política contextual de Argentina.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariana Chudnovsky & Andrea González & Juan Carlos Hallak & Mercedes Sidders, 2017. "Construyendo capacidades institucionales para implementar PDP: El caso de las políticas de promoción del diseño en la Argentina," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8660, Inter-American Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:brikps:8660
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    References listed on IDEAS

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