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Strategic Behavior, Institutional Change, and the Future of Agriculture


  • Stanley R. Johnson


Policy reforms that increase the roles of markets in agriculture and related institutional changes are occurring worldwide and are accompanied by rapid technical change. With the evolving role of government, new institutions are emerging for shaping the strategic behavior of public and private sector agents. This paper suggests that the use of game theoretic formulations, combined with modern concepts of mechanism design, offers an approach to policy analysis and the study of institutional change that is valuable to professionals involved in the economics of agriculture.

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  • Stanley R. Johnson, 1998. "Strategic Behavior, Institutional Change, and the Future of Agriculture," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 98-wp199, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:ias:fpaper:98-wp199

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Murray C. Kemp, 1968. "Some Issues In The Analysis Of Trade Gains," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 149-161.
    2. Batra, Raveendra & Pattanaik, Prasanta K, 1970. "Domestic Distortions and the Gains from Trade," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 80(319), pages 638-649, September.
    3. Yu, Eden S H, 1982. "Unemployment and the Theory of Customs Unions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(366), pages 399-404, June.
    4. Batra, Raveendra N & Beladi, Hamid, 1990. "Pattern of Trade between Underemployed Economies," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 57(228), pages 485-493, November.
    5. Choi, E Kwan & Beladi, Hamid, 1993. "Optimal Trade Policies for a Small Open Economy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 60(240), pages 475-486, November.
    6. Batra, Ravi, 1992. "The Fallacy of Free Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(1), pages 19-31, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Puaha, Hubertus & Tilley, Daniel S., 2002. "Coalition Development In The Agricultural Marketing System," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19721, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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