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Unibank and the Latvian Banking System: Lending Policies and Problem Loans

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  • G. Gondelman

Abstract

This paper discusses the transformation of the Soviet state banking system into the Bank of Latvia and its further restructuring, which led to the formation of the Latvian state joint-stock commercial bank Latvian Unibank. It is argued that its foundation and development was complicated by problems of non- performing loans.

Suggested Citation

  • G. Gondelman, 1997. "Unibank and the Latvian Banking System: Lending Policies and Problem Loans," CERT Discussion Papers 9703, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:9703
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    File URL: http://www2.hw.ac.uk/sml/downloads/cert/wpa/1997/dp9703.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier X, 1996. "The Classical Approach to Convergence Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 1019-1036, July.
    2. Schiantarelli, Fabio, 1996. "Financial Constraints and Investment: Methodological Issues and International Evidence," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 70-89, Summer.
    3. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1996. "Achieving Rapid Growth in the Transition Economies of Central Europe," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0073, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    4. János Kornai & Collegium BudapÈst, 1995. "Eliminating the shortage economy: a general analysis and examination of the dÈvelopments in Hungary: Part," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 3(2), pages 149-168, June.
    5. Anders Åslund & Peter Boone & Simon Johnson, 1996. "How to Stabilize: Lessons from Post-communist Countries," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(1), pages 217-314.
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