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Intergenerational public and private sector redistribution in Sweden 2003

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Abstract

We describe intergenerational redistribution in Sweden the year 2003. The high Swedish tax ratio of around 50-60 percent of GDP per capita is partly explained by every individual getting a lot back in terms of transfers and part in government consumption. Another reason is that most transfers are taxed, which results in double counting some tax payments. Here we attempt to correct the age profile of net tax payment for these effects and compare these to the gross profiles. On a per capita basis we find, using this netting, that the mean age of tax payers drops from 55 to 48 and that the taxes paid falls by 23.2 percent. We also look at age profiles of private and public consumption, and net private consumption, i.e., the difference between private disposable income and private consumption. We find that private net redistribution flows mainly from middle and old age to young ages, while net public transfers flow to both young and old.

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  • Forsell, Charlotte & Hallberg, Daniel & Lindh, Thomas & Öberg, Gustav, 2008. "Intergenerational public and private sector redistribution in Sweden 2003," Arbetsrapport 2008:4, Institute for Futures Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifswps:2008_004 Note: ISSN: 1652-120X; ISBN: 978-91-85619-23-8
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    1. Wasmer, Etienne, 2002. "Interpreting Europe and US labor markets differences: the specificity of human capital investments," Arbetsrapport 2003:9, Institute for Futures Studies.
    2. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2002. "Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1133-1191.
    3. Palme, Mårten & Svensson, Ingemar, 2002. "Pathways to Retirement and Retirement Incentives in Sweden," Arbetsrapport 2002:9, Institute for Futures Studies.
    4. Lagerlöf, Nils-Petter, 2001. "From Malthus to Modern Growth: Can Epidemics Explain the Three Regimes?," Arbetsrapport 2001:1, Institute for Futures Studies.
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    6. Barnekow, Erik, 2002. "Demografi och finansmarknad - en översikt av empirisk forskning," Arbetsrapport 2002:7, Institute for Futures Studies.
    7. Sommestad, Lena, 2001. "Health and Wealth: The Contribution of Welfare State Policies to Economic Growth," Arbetsrapport 2001:3, Institute for Futures Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bernhard Hammer & Alexia Prskawetz, 2013. "The public reallocation of resources across age: a comparison of Austria and Sweden," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 541-560, August.
    2. Hammer, Bernhard & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2012. "The public reallocation of resources across age: A comparison of Austria and Sweden," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 05/2012, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).
    3. Daniel Hallberg & Thomas Lindh & Gustav Oberg & Charlotte Thulstrup, 2011. "Intergenerational redistribution in Sweden's public and private sectors," Chapters,in: Population Aging and the Generational Economy, chapter 23 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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    Keywords

    Intergenerational; redistribution;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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