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Dealing with employment risk: policy options for emerging markets

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  • Simon Commander

    () (EBRD, IE Business School and Altura Advisers)

Abstract

The paper looks at the experience of advanced economies in dealing with employment volatility. It examines in detail the impact of labour market institutions on equilibrium unemployment and the possible lessons for emerging market economies trying to design policy for dealing with unemployment and a wider, growing demand for social protection from their citizens. Part of the paper concentrates on the transition economies whose institutional context may be relevant to other emerging markets. Some leading principles in policy design are elaborated that take into account some of the common features of emerging markets, notably a protected public sector, large informal sectors and weak institutions .

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Commander, 2010. "Dealing with employment risk: policy options for emerging markets," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2010-30, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  • Handle: RePEc:hdr:papers:hdrp-2010-30
    as

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    File URL: http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2010/papers/HDRP_2010_30.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Milan Vodopivec, 2013. "Introducing unemployment insurance to developing countries," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-23, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human development; employment; unemployment; labour market; emerging markets; social protection;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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