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Évolution des émissions de CO2 liées aux mobilités quotidiennes: une stabilité en trompe l'œil


  • Louafi Bouzouina

    (LET - Laboratoire d'économie des transports - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - ENTPE - École Nationale des Travaux Publics de l'État - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Jean-Pierre Nicolas

    () (LET - Laboratoire d'économie des transports - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - ENTPE - École Nationale des Travaux Publics de l'État - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Florian Vanco

    (CERTU - Centre d'études sur les réseaux, les transports, l'urbanisme et les constructions publiques - Avant création Cerema)


Changing CO2 emissions in relation to daily travel patterns: deceptively constant. - Alternatives to the use of automobiles have regained attention at the urban level. Against this background, we look at the spatial context of this attention in the agglomeration of Lyon. More specifically, we look at how CO2 emissions that are associated with everyday mobility have developed until recently. First, we estimate the intensity of CO2 emissions per day based on the last two household travel surveys done in the Lyon conurbation in 1995 and 2006. Even if the global emission level remains stable, we aim to analyze the dynamics of the socio-economic evolution of mobility between the two periods. To that end, we have abstracted the linkage of a specific form of mobility (mode of transport and distance) to a specific population group (status, residential location, car access, gender). This typology helps us highlight the groups where emission rates are significantly higher, and where the focus on emission reduction should be intensified.

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  • Louafi Bouzouina & Jean-Pierre Nicolas & Florian Vanco, 2011. "Évolution des émissions de CO2 liées aux mobilités quotidiennes: une stabilité en trompe l'œil," Post-Print halshs-00629769, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00629769
    DOI: 10.1007/s13547-011-0008-2
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    Daily mobility; Mode of transport; CO2 emission; Household Travel Survey; Lyon agglomeration; Socio-economic typology; Mobilité quotidienne; Distance; Mode de transport; Émissions de CO2; Enquête ménages déplacement; Agglomération lyonnaise; Typologie socio-économique;

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