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Modèle de congestion routière à deux itinéraires : une expérience


  • Yannick Gabuthy

    (GATE - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Ecole Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Matthieu Neveu

    (GATE - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - Ecole Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)


Most theoretical studies of traffic congestion during the morning commute have been limited to one origin, one destination, and one route. The purpose of our paper is to generalize the analysis of Arnott et al. (1990b) to situations with a single origin and destination connected by two routes, and to test the model in an experiment. The theoretical result shows that commuters choose to take the road by group. The group's size is equal to the route's capacity of absorption and the route choice depends on the tolling regime (high toll or low toll). The experimental evidence does not support the predictions of the model : individuals solve the coordination problem in order to avoid a prohibitive congestion cost, however, experimental subjects do not follow the theoretical departure distribution. Route split is significantly sensitive to the choice of tolling regime. Furthermore, the impact of past congestion on route choices and departure time decisions is reduced by the level of the toll.

Suggested Citation

  • Yannick Gabuthy & Matthieu Neveu, 2002. "Modèle de congestion routière à deux itinéraires : une expérience," Post-Print halshs-00178448, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00178448
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