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The Use of Transferable Permits in Transport Policy

Author

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  • Charles Raux

    () (LET - Laboratoire d'économie des transports - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - ENTPE - École Nationale des Travaux Publics de l'État - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This paper considers potential use of domestic transferable, or tradable, permit systems for the purposes of travel management, especially reducing environmental nuisances. The main arguments for and against the use of permits are analyzed. Secondly two case studies of existing permit systems are examined. The main conclusions are that tradable permits can address greenhouse gas and regional atmospheric pollutant emissions, and are suitable for congestion on a restricted time–space basis. Permits applied to mobile sources are technically feasible at acceptable financial cost for protecting sensitive geographical areas, and schemes applied to automakers for unitary vehicle emissions are also viable.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Raux, 2004. "The Use of Transferable Permits in Transport Policy," Post-Print halshs-00067895, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00067895
    DOI: 10.1016/j.trd.2004.01.001
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00067895
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    File URL: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00067895/document
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:trapol:v:63:y:2018:i:c:p:98-107 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Marco Percoco, 2010. "Urban Transport Policies And The Environment: Evidence From Italy," Articles, International Journal of Transport Economics, vol. 37(2).
    3. Santos, Georgina & Behrendt, Hannah & Maconi, Laura & Shirvani, Tara & Teytelboym, Alexander, 2010. "Part I: Externalities and economic policies in road transport," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 2-45.
    4. Charles Raux, 2009. "Umweltzertifikate im Verkehrsbereich," Post-Print halshs-01735915, HAL.
    5. repec:spr:nathaz:v:88:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2886-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Yang, Hai & Wang, Xiaolei, 2011. "Managing network mobility with tradable credits," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 580-594, March.
    7. Harwatt, Helen & Tight, Miles & Bristow, Abigail L. & Gühnemann, Astrid, 2011. "Personal carbon trading and fuel price increases in the transport sector: an exploratory study of public response in the UK," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 47, pages 47-70.
    8. Wadud, Zia, 2011. "Personal tradable carbon permits for road transport: Why, why not and who wins?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 1052-1065.
    9. Alberto M. Zanni & Abigail L. Bristow & Mark Wardman, 2013. "The potential behavioural effect of personal carbon trading: results from an experimental survey," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 222-243, July.
    10. Ch'ng, Kean Siang, 2010. "Individual tradable permit market and traffic congestion: An experimental study," MPRA Paper 26638, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Fan, Wenbo & Jiang, Xinguo, 2013. "Tradable mobility permits in roadway capacity allocation: Review and appraisal," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 132-142.
    12. Raux, Charles & Marlot, Grégoire, 2005. "A system of tradable CO2 permits applied to fuel consumption by motorists," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 255-265, May.
    13. Santos, Georgina, 2017. "Road fuel taxes in Europe: Do they internalize road transport externalities?," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 120-134.
    14. Charles Raux, 2008. "Tradable driving rights in urban areas: their potential for tackling congestion and traffic-related pollution," Post-Print halshs-00185012, HAL.
    15. Wang, Xiaolei & Yang, Hai & Zhu, Daoli & Li, Changmin, 2012. "Tradable travel credits for congestion management with heterogeneous users," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 426-437.
    16. Charles Raux, 2011. "Downstream Emissions Trading for Transport," Post-Print halshs-01695597, HAL.
    17. Fan, Jin & He, Haonan & Wu, Yanrui, 2016. "Personal carbon trading and subsidies for hybrid electric vehicles," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 164-173.
    18. Charles Raux & Amandine Chevalier & Emmanuel Bougna & Denis Hilton, 2015. "Mobility Choices and Climate Change: Assessing the Effects of Social Norms and Economic Incentives through Discrete Choice Experiments," Post-Print halshs-01158088, HAL.

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