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Family Policies in France: between generosity and ambiguity

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  • Hélène Périvier

    () (OFCE - Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques - Sciences Po - Sciences Po)

Abstract

The trend of female employment in France is original in comparison with the other European countries. Although French women have more children than their European sister members they are massively present on the labour market. As Jeanne Fagnani (2001) emphasises it, this paradox changes the general idea about the negative impact of female activity on fertility (...).

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  • Hélène Périvier, 2002. "Family Policies in France: between generosity and ambiguity," Post-Print hal-00972696, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00972696
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal-sciencespo.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00972696
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    1. Willem Adema & Marcel Einerhand & Bengt Eklind & Jorgen Lotz & Mark Pearson, 1996. "Net Public Social Expenditure," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 19, OECD Publishing.
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