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La RSE influence-t-elle le choix de localisation des firmes multinationales ? Le cas de l’environnement


  • Rémi Bazillier

    () (LEO - Laboratoire d'économie d'Orleans - UO - Université d'Orléans - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Sophie Hatte

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, URN - Université de Rouen Normandie - NU - Normandie Université, CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Julien Vauday

    (CEPN - Centre d'Economie de l'Université Paris Nord - UP13 - Université Paris 13 - USPC - Université Sorbonne Paris Cité - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)


Le but de ce papier est d’étudier l’influence de la Responsabilité Sociale des Entreprises (RSE) et des réglementations environnementales nationales sur les choix de localisation des 600 plus grandes entreprises européennes. Grâce au score environnemental fourni par VIGEO nous pouvons tester l’influence des performances environnementales réelles des entreprises. Nous trouvons un effet un terme d’interaction négatif entre la performance environnementale des firmes et les réglementations environnementales nationales, confirmant une possible substitution entre la RSE et les réglementations nationales. Toutes choses égales par ailleurs, les firmes affichant les meilleures performances environnementales ont tendance à relativement moins se localiser dans les pays respectueux de l’environnement. Ce résultat est aussi valide lorsque nous étudions les déterminants du nombre de salariés par pays. Par contre, cet effet est observé uniquement pour les normes environnementales de facto et non de jure. Cela suggère un possible comportement stratégique des entreprises exploitant les différences entre les réglementations environnementales formelles et leur mise en œuvre effective.

Suggested Citation

  • Rémi Bazillier & Sophie Hatte & Julien Vauday, 2014. "La RSE influence-t-elle le choix de localisation des firmes multinationales ? Le cas de l’environnement," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01362444, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-01362444
    DOI: 10.4000/rei.6040
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