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How does Decentralized Minimum Wage Setting affect Employment and Informality? The case of Indonesia

Author

Listed:
  • Margherita Comola

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Luiz De Mello

    () (Economics - OECD)

Abstract

The Indonesian labor market is characterized by widespread and growing informality (defined as non-salaried work). To what extent can the growth in informality be attributed to a sharp increase in the real value of the minimum wage since 2001, when minimum-wage setting was decentralized to the provincial governments? To answer this and related questions we use survey data on the labor market, on household income and expenditure, and on the industrial sector to construct a district-level dataset spanning the period 1996 to 2004. The effects of changes in the minimum wage on unemployment, formal-sector employment, and the incidence of informality in urban areas are estimated by fixed effects with a seemingly unrelated regression estimator. We find that an increase in the ratio of the minimum to the mean wage is associated with a net increase in employment: a rise in informal-sector employment more than compensates for job losses in the formal sector.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Margherita Comola & Luiz De Mello, 2011. "How does Decentralized Minimum Wage Setting affect Employment and Informality? The case of Indonesia," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00684165, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-00684165
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00684165
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Jong-Wha & Wie, Dainn, 2015. "Technological Change, Skill Demand, and Wage Inequality: Evidence from Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 238-250.
    2. World Bank, 2013. "Minimum Wage Policy : Lessons with a Focus on the ASEAN Region," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16687, The World Bank.
    3. Maike Hohberg & Jann Lay, 2015. "The impact of minimum wages on informal and formal labor market outcomes: evidence from Indonesia," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-25, December.
    4. Alexander Muravyev & Aleksey Oshchepkov, 2013. "Minimum wages and labor market outcomes: evidence from the emerging economy of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 29/EC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    5. Muravyev, Alexander & Oshchepkov, Aleksey, 2013. "Minimum Wages, Unemployment and Informality: Evidence from Panel Data on Russian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Belman, Dale. & Wolfson, Paul., 2016. "What does the minimum wage do in developing countries? : A review of studies and methodologies," ILO Working Papers 994893283402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. repec:spr:ijlaec:v:60:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s41027-017-0077-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:135-157 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ernest Dautovic & Harald Hau & Yi Huang, 2017. "The Consumption Response to Minimum Wages: Evidence from Chinese Households," IHEID Working Papers 01-2017, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    10. Haroon Bhorat & Ravi Kanbur & Benjamin Stanwix, 2017. "Minimum Wages in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Primer," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 32(1), pages 21-74.
    11. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2017. "The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Male and Female Employment and Earnings in India," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 34(1), pages 28-64, March.
    12. Del Carpio, Ximena & Messina, Julián & Sanz-de-Galdeano, Anna, 2014. "Minimum Wage: Does It Improve Welfare in Thailand?," IZA Discussion Papers 7911, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Rothenberg, Alexander D. & Gaduh, Arya & Burger, Nicholas E. & Chazali, Charina & Tjandraningsih, Indrasari & Radikun, Rini & Sutera, Cole & Weilant, Sarah, 2016. "Rethinking Indonesia’s Informal Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 96-113.
    14. Ximena Del Carpio & Ha Nguyen & Laura Pabon & Liang Wang, 2015. "Do minimum wages affect employment? Evidence from the manufacturing sector in Indonesia," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-30, December.
    15. Haroon Bhorat & Tara Caetano & Benjamin Jourdan & Ravi Kanbur & Christopher Rooney & Benjamin Stanwix & Ingrid Woolard, 2016. "Investigating the Feasibility of a National Minimum Wage for South Africa," Working Papers 201601, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    16. Syamsul Hidayat Pasaribu, 2016. "Persistence of Individual Unemployment in Indonesia: Dynamic Probit Analysis from Panel SUSENAS 2008-2010," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 1239-1246.
    17. Yamada, Ken, 2016. "Tracing the impact of large minimum wage changes on household welfare in Indonesia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 287-303.
    18. Andrea Garnero, 2018. "The dog that barks doesn’t bite: coverage and compliance of sectoral minimum wages in Italy," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-24, December.

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