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Combining the Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Poverty Measurement and Analysis. The Practice and the Potential

Author

Listed:
  • Carvalho, S.
  • White, H.

Abstract

The quantitative and qualitative approaches to poverty measurement and analysis have often been treated by practitioners as two distinct--even opposing--approaches. This paper highlights the key characteristics of the two approaches, examines the strengths and weaknesses of each, and analyzes the potential for combining the two approaches in analytical work on poverty. The main conclusion of this paper is that sole reliance on either the quantitative or the qualitative approach is often likely to be less desirable than combining the two.

Suggested Citation

  • Carvalho, S. & White, H., 1997. "Combining the Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Poverty Measurement and Analysis. The Practice and the Potential," Papers 366, World Bank - Technical Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:wobate:366
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pi Alperin, Maria Noel, 2008. "A comparison of multidimensional deprivation characteristics between natives and immigrants in Luxembourg," IRISS Working Paper Series 2008-14, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:173-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Omilola, Babatunde, 2009. "Rural non-farm income and inequality in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 899, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. María Noel Pi Alperin, 2009. "The impact of Argentina's social assistance program plan jefes y jefas de hogar on structural poverty," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 0(Special i), pages 49-81.
    5. Raza Ali Khan, 2007. "Understanding Poverty through the Eyes of Low-salaried Government Employees: A Case Study of the NED University of Engineering and Technology," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 623-641.
    6. Anita Alves Pena, 2013. "Poverty measurement for a binational population," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 10(2), pages 254-269, May.
    7. Sonali Senaratna Sellamuttu & Takeshi Aida & Ryuji Kasahara & Yasuyuki Sawada & Deeptha Wijerathna, 2014. "How Access to Irrigation Influences Poverty and Livelihoods: A Case Study from Sri Lanka," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(5), pages 748-768, May.
    8. Widjajanti Suhayo & Akhmadi & Hastuti & Rizky Filaili & Sri Budiati & Wawan Munawar, 2005. "Developing a Poverty Map for Indonesia (A Tool for Better Targeting in Poverty Reduction and Social Protection Programs)," Development Economics Working Papers 22541, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    9. Peter Davis & Bob Baulch, 2010. "Casting the net wide and deep: lessons learned in a mixed-methods study of poverty dynamics in rural Bangladesh," Working Papers id:2674, eSocialSciences.
    10. Elske van de Fliert & Ann Braun, 2002. "Conceptualizing integrative, farmer participatory research for sustainable agriculture: From opportunities to impact," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 19(1), pages 25-38, March.
    11. Maia Green, 2006. "Reresenting Poverty and Attacking Representations: Some Anthroplogical Perspectives on Poverty in Development," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-009, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Sharp, Kay, 2007. "Squaring the "Q"s? Methodological Reflections on a Study of Destitution in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 264-280, February.
    13. David Owyong, 2000. "Measuring the trickle-down effect: a case study on Singapore," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(8), pages 535-539.
    14. Radeny, Maren & van den Berg, Marrit & Schipper, Rob, 2012. "Rural Poverty Dynamics in Kenya: Structural Declines and Stochastic Escapes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1577-1593.
    15. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 1998. "Modélisation des déterminants de la pauvreté et marché du travail en Afrique : le cas du Burkina Faso," Documents de travail 32, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    16. Hentschel, Jesko, 1998. "Distinguishing between types of data and methods of collecting them," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1914, The World Bank.
    17. Senaratna Sellamuttu, Sonali, 2013. "How access to irrigation influences poverty and livelihoods: a case study from Sri Lanka. Impact assessment of infrastructure projects on poverty reduction," IWMI Working Papers H045795, International Water Management Institute.
    18. Nelson, Suzanne & Frakenberger, Tim & Brown, Vicky & Presnall, Carrie & Downen, Jeanne, 2015. "Ex-Post impact assessment review of IFPRI’s research program on social protection, 2000–2012," Impact assessments 40, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    19. Kanbur, Ravi & Shaffer, Paul, 2007. "Epistemology, Normative Theory and Poverty Analysis: Implications for Q-Squared in Practice," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 183-196, February.
    20. Maia Green, 2006. "Representing poverty and attacking representations: Perspectives on poverty from social anthropology," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(7), pages 1108-1129.
    21. Caroline M Kende-Robb, 2003. "Poverty and Social Impact Analysis; Linking Macroeconomic Policies to Poverty Outcomes: Summary of Early Experiences," IMF Working Papers 03/43, International Monetary Fund.
    22. Howard White, 2011. "Achieving high-quality impact evaluation design through mixed methods: the case of infrastructure," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 131-144.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    POVERTY;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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