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Traverse Analysis: Progenitors and Pioneers

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  • Richardson, C.

Abstract

Traverse analysis has two progenitors (David Ricardo, Karl Marx) and five pioneers: Michal Kalecki, Adolph Lowe, Joan Robinson, J.R. Hicks, and John Hicks. Defined as the dynamic disequilibrium adjustment-path that connects an initial with a different terminal state of economic growth, the traverse comes in four "flavours". There are neoclassical (J.R. Hicks), neo-Austrian (John Hicks), observed (Ricardo, Marx, Kalecki, Robinson), and instrumental (Lowe) traverses. These terms are explained and the seven seminal contributions are summarised and commented upon in this paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Richardson, C., 2001. "Traverse Analysis: Progenitors and Pioneers," Papers 2001-06, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:tasman:2001-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    MACROECONOMICS ; HISTORICAL ANALYSIS ; PHILOSOPHY;

    JEL classification:

    • B22 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Macroeconomics
    • B20 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - General

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