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Optimal Commodity Taxes in Australia and their Sensitivity to Consumer Preference and Demographic Specification

Author

Listed:
  • Blacklow, P.
  • Ray, R.

Abstract

This study provides evidence on optimal commodity tax rates in Australia, and on their sensitivity to demand function and demographic specification. The optimal tax algorithm, proposed and used here, allows the social welfare weights to depend on prices, household composition and aggregate household expenditure. The optimal commodity tax rates are compared with the actual tax rates not only with regard to their magnitude but, also, in terms of their redistributive impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Blacklow, P. & Ray, R., 2000. "Optimal Commodity Taxes in Australia and their Sensitivity to Consumer Preference and Demographic Specification," Papers 2001-01, Tasmania - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:tasman:2001-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:53:y:2008:i:02:n:s0217590808002951 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    TAXATION ; PRICES ; HOUSEHOLD;

    JEL classification:

    • B23 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Econometrics; Quantitative and Mathematical Studies
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation

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