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The Electoral Politics of Extreme Policies


  • Glazer, A.
  • Konrad, K.A.


A government may adopt extreme policies (policies lying outside the interval between the ideal points of the political parties) for electoral purposes. It can benefit when a change in policy is costly and when the opposing party cannot commit to maintaining the status quo.
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Suggested Citation

  • Glazer, A. & Konrad, K.A., 1995. "The Electoral Politics of Extreme Policies," Papers 94-95-23, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:calirv:94-95-23

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carter, R.A.L. & Srivastava, M.S. & Srivastava, V.K. & Ullah, A., 1990. "Unbiased Estimation of the MSE Matrix of Stein-Rule Estimators, Confidence Ellipsoids, and Hypothesis Testing," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(01), pages 63-74, March.
    2. Zellner, Arnold & Hong, Chansik, 1989. "Forecasting international growth rates using Bayesian shrinkage and other procedures," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 183-202, January.
    3. Brownstone, David, 1990. "Bootstrapping improved estimators for linear regression models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1-2), pages 171-187.
    4. Vinod, H. D., 1995. "Double bootstrap for shrinkage estimators," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 287-302, August.
    5. Garcia-Ferrer, Antonio, et al, 1987. "Macroeconomic Forecasting Using Pooled International Data," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(1), pages 53-67, January.
    6. Min, Chung-ki & Zellner, Arnold, 1993. "Bayesian and non-Bayesian methods for combining models and forecasts with applications to forecasting international growth rates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1-2), pages 89-118, March.
    7. Zellner, Arnold & Hong, Chansik & Min, Chung-ki, 1991. "Forecasting turning points in international output growth rates using Bayesian exponentially weighted autoregression, time-varying parameter, and pooling techniques," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1-2), pages 275-304.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zakharov Alexei, 2005. "Candidate location and endogenous valence," EERC Working Paper Series 05-17e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    2. Elie Appelbaum, 2008. "Extremism: Root Causes and Strategic Use in Conflicts," Working Papers 2008_02, York University, Department of Economics.
    3. Elie Appelbaum & Eliakim Katz, 2007. "Political extremism in the presence of a free rider problem," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 31-40, October.
    4. repec:spr:sochwe:v:48:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s00355-017-1043-y is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Gil Epstein, 2007. "Extremism within the family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 707-715, July.
    6. Hans Gersbach & Philippe Muller & Oriol Tejada, 2017. "A Dynamic Model of Electoral Competition with Costly Policy Changes," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 17/270, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    7. Amihai Glazer, 2008. "Urban Extremism," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 307-318, October.
    8. S. Sajeesh & Jagmohan S. Raju, 2010. "Positioning and Pricing in a Variety Seeking Market," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(6), pages 949-961, June.
    9. Schultz, Christian, 2002. "Policy biases with voters' uncertainty about the economy and the government," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 487-506, March.
    10. Kimiko Terai, 2009. "Electoral control over policy-motivated candidates and their policy biases," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 43-64, January.
    11. Egil Matsen & Øystein Thøgersen, 2010. "Habit formation, strategic extremism, and debt policy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 165-180, October.
    12. Hans Gersbach & Philippe Muller & Oriol Tejada, 2015. "Costs of Change, Political Polarization, and Re-election Hurdles," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 15/222, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    13. Gersbach, Hans & Muller, Philippe & Tejada, Oriol, 2016. "The Effects of Higher Re-election Hurdles and Costs of Policy Change on Political Polarization," CEPR Discussion Papers 11375, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Elie Appelbaum, 2006. "Strategic extremism," Working Papers 2006_12, York University, Department of Economics.
    15. Rajeev K. Tyagi, 2000. "Sequential Product Positioning Under Differential Costs," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 46(7), pages 928-940, July.
    16. repec:ejw:journl:v:12:y:2015:i:2:p:242-259 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. repec:elg:eechap:15325_4 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Elie Appelbaum, 2004. "Union militancy and the probability of strikes," Working Papers 2004_4, York University, Department of Economics.
    19. Gil S. Epstein & Shmuel Nitzan, 2005. "Lobbying and Compromise," CESifo Working Paper Series 1413, CESifo Group Munich.

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