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On the Use of Ceiling-Price Commitment by Monopolists

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Listed:
  • Chen, Y.
  • Rosenthal, R.W.

Abstract

The establishment of an asking, or ceiling, price from which reductions can be bargained is a common selling practice. For a monopolist seller of a single object, this article characterizes the best such ceiling price and shows that its use is optimal among all incentive-compatible mechanisms in a class of situations characterized by customers (1) who arrive one at a time and so do not compete with other directly and (2) who learn their idiosyncratic willingnesses to pay only by incurring idiosyncratic inspection costs.
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Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Y. & Rosenthal, R.W., 1994. "On the Use of Ceiling-Price Commitment by Monopolists," Papers 45, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bostin:45
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    Cited by:

    1. Genesove, David & Han, Lu, 2012. "Search and matching in the housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 31-45.
    2. Wang, Ruqu, 2000. "Bidding and renegotiation in procurement auctions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1577-1597, August.
    3. Merlo, Antonio & Ortalo-Magne, Francois, 2004. "Bargaining over residential real estate: evidence from England," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 192-216, September.
    4. Christos Constantatos, 2007. "Excessive Rents and Non-Compliance with Price Ceilings," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 5(2), pages 225-231.
    5. Peyman Khezr & Flavio M. Menezes, 2016. "Dynamic and Static Asking Prices in the Sydney Housing Market," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(297), pages 209-221, June.
    6. Konishi, Hideo & Sandfort, Michael T., 2002. "Expanding demand through price advertisement," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 20(7), pages 965-994, September.
    7. Han, Lu & Strange, William C., 2016. "What is the role of the asking price for a house?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 115-130.
    8. Inami, Yusuke, 2011. "The buy price in auctions with discrete type distributions," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 1-11, January.
    9. Jianping GU & Yasushi ASAMI, 2016. "Optimal List Price And Duration Of Vacancy In The Housing Market In Tokyo," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 182-201, November.
    10. Gill, David & Thanassoulis, John, 2009. "The impact of bargaining on markets with price takers: Too many bargainers spoil the broth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(6), pages 658-674, August.
    11. Lu Han & William C. Strange, 2014. "Bidding Wars for Houses," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 1-32, March.
    12. Liu, Crocker H. & Nowak, Adam & Rosenthal, Stuart S., 2016. "Housing price bubbles, new supply, and within-city dynamics," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 55-72.
    13. Han, Lu & Strange, William C., 2015. "The Microstructure of Housing Markets," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    14. Simon Stevenson & James Young, 2015. "The Role of Undisclosed Reserves in English Open Outcry Auctions," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 43(2), pages 375-402, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    game theory ; prices;

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