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Technology and Bilateral Trade

  • Jonathan Eaton
  • Samuel Kortum

We develop a Ricardian model to explore the role of trade in spreading hte benefits of innovation. The theory delivers an equation for bilateral trade that, on its surface, resembles a gravity specification, but identifies underlying parameters of technology. We estimate the equation using trade in manufactures among the OECD. The parameter estimates allow us to simulate the model to investigate the role of trade in spreading the benefits of innovation and to examine the effects of lower trade barriers. Typically foreigners benefit by only a tenth as much as the innovating country, but in some cases the benefits to close neighbors approach those of the innovator.

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Paper provided by Boston University, Institute for Economic Development in its series Boston University - Institute for Economic Development with number 79.

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Date of creation: Sep 1997
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Handle: RePEc:fth:bosecd:79
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  18. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  25. Deardorff, A.V., 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade : Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," Papers 95-05, Michigan - Center for Research on Economic & Social Theory.
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