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Rising food prices: What should be done? [In Chinese]

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  • von Braun, Joachim

Abstract

"The sharp increase in food prices over the past couple of years has raised serious concerns about the food and nutrition situation of poor people in developing countries, about inflation, and—in some countries—about civil unrest. Real prices are still below their mid-1970s peak, but they have reached their highest point since that time. Both developing- and developed-country governments have roles to play in bringing prices under control and in helping poor people cope with higher food bills. In 2007 the food price index calculated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) rose by nearly 40 percent, compared with 9 percent the year before, and in the first months of 2008 prices again increased drastically. Nearly every agricultural commodity is part of this rising price trend. Since 2000—a year of low prices—the wheat price in the international market has more than tripled and maize prices have more than doubled. The price of rice jumped to unprecedented levels in March 2008. Dairy products, meat, poultry, palm oil, and cassava have also experienced price hikes. When adjusted for inflation and the dollar's decline (by reporting in euros, for example), food price increases are smaller but still dramatic, with often serious consequences for the purchasing power of the poor. National governments and international actors are taking various steps to try to minimize the effects of higher international prices for domestic prices and to mitigate impacts on particular groups. Some of these actions are likely to help stabilize and reduce food prices, whereas others may help certain groups at the expense of others or actually make food prices more volatile in the long run and seriously distort trade. What is needed is more effective and coherent action to help the most vulnerable populations cope with the drastic and immediate hikes in their food bills and to help farmers meet the rising demand for agricultural products." from Author's text

Suggested Citation

  • von Braun, Joachim, 2008. "Rising food prices: What should be done? [In Chinese]," Policy briefs 1 CH, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:polbrf:1ch
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    Cited by:

    1. Ghoneim, Ahmed Farouk, 2012. "The Political Economy of Food Price Policy in Egypt," WIDER Working Paper Series 096, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Burakov, D., 2016. "Oil Prices, Exchange Rate and Prices for Agricultural Commodities: Empirical Evidence from Russia," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 8(2), June.
    3. Sushil Pandey & Timothy Sulser & Mark W Rosegrant & Humnath Bhandari, 2010. "Rice Price Crisis: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 7(2), pages 1-15, December.
    4. Yu, T. Edward & Tokgoz, Simla & Wailes, Eric & Chavez, Eddie C., 2017. "A quantitative analysis of trade policy responses to higher world agricultural commodity prices:," IFPRI book chapters,in: Agriculture, development, and the global trading system: 2000– 2015, chapter 11 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Mariano, Marc Jim M. & Giesecke, James A., 2014. "The macroeconomic and food security implications of price interventions in the Philippine rice market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 350-361.
    6. Nazlioglu, Saban, 2011. "World oil and agricultural commodity prices: Evidence from nonlinear causality," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2935-2943, May.
    7. Monteiro, Nathalia & Altman, Ira & Lahiri, Sajal, 2012. "The impact of ethanol production on food prices: The role of interplay between the U.S. and Brazil," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 193-199.
    8. de Brauw, Alan, 2011. "Migration and child development during the food price crisis in El Salvador," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 28-40, February.
    9. Christophe Gouel & Sébastien Jean, 2015. "Optimal Food Price Stabilization in a Small Open Developing Country," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(1), pages 72-101.
    10. Ali, Tariq & Huang, Jikun & Yang, Jun, 2013. "Impact assessment of global and national biofuels developments on agriculture in Pakistan," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 466-474.
    11. Dmitry Burakov, 2016. "Elasticity of Agricultural Prices in Russia: An Empirical Study of Energy and Monetary Channels," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 551-562.
    12. Ingo Outes-Leon & Catherine Porter & Alan Sánchez, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru: A Within-Sibling Investigation," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3430, Inter-American Development Bank.
    13. Nazlioglu, Saban & Soytas, Ugur, 2012. "Oil price, agricultural commodity prices, and the dollar: A panel cointegration and causality analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1098-1104.
    14. Rosegrant, Mark W. & Bhandari, Humnath & Pandey, Sushil & Sulser, Timothy, 2. "Rice Price Crisis: Causes, Impacts, and Solutions," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 7(2).
    15. Alom, Fardous, 2011. "Economic Effects of Oil and Food Price Shocks in Asia and Pacific Countries: An Application of SVAR Model," 2011 Conference, August 25-26, 2011, Nelson, New Zealand 115346, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    16. Ingo Outes-Leon & Catherine Porter & Alan Sanchez, 2011. "Early Nutrition and Cognition in Peru," Research Department Publications 4743, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    17. repec:eee:rensus:v:78:y:2017:i:c:p:503-516 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Mkhabela, Thulasizwe S. & Nyhodo, Bonani, 2011. "Farm and Retail Prices in the South African Poultry Industry: Do the Twain Meet?," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 14(3).

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    Keywords

    Food prices; Food supply; Food demand; Social protection; Agricultural research; Agricultural policy; Agricultural subsidies;

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