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Margin requirements, speculative trading and stock price fluctuations: the case of Japan

Author

Listed:
  • Steve Peristiani
  • Gikas A. Hardouvelis

    (Barnard College
    University of California Berkeley
    Bank of Greece
    Federal Reserve Bank)

Abstract

An increase in margin requirements in the First Section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange is followed by a decline in margin borrowing, trading volume, the proportion of trading performed through margin accounts, the growth in stock prices, and the conditional volatility of daily returns. The nonmarginable Second Section stocks show a smaller change in volatility and only a delayed weak price response. The hypothesis that margin requirements restrict the behavior of destabilizing speculators can explain these correlations but cannot explain the observation that individuals, the most active users of margin funds, appear to be good market timers.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Peristiani & Gikas A. Hardouvelis, 1990. "Margin requirements, speculative trading and stock price fluctuations: the case of Japan," Research Paper 9006, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednrp:9006
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    Cited by:

    1. Alex Garivaltis, 2019. "The Laws of Motion of the Broker Call Rate in the United States," International Journal of Financial Studies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(4), pages 1-23, October.
    2. Abdur Chowdhury, 1997. "Margin requirements and stock market volatility in Thailand," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 83-87.
    3. Santa-Clara, Pedro & Saretto, Alessio, 2009. "Option strategies: Good deals and margin calls," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 391-417, August.
    4. Wen-Chung Guo & Frank Wang & Ho-Mou Wu, 2011. "Financial leverage and market volatility with diverse beliefs," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 47(2), pages 337-364, June.
    5. Bignon, Vincent & Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2016. "The Failure of a Clearinghouse: Empirical Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 11630, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Matsypura, Dmytro & Pauwels, Laurent L., 2016. "Does portfolio margining make borrowing more attractive?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 128-134.
    7. Daskalaki, Charoula & Skiadopoulos, George, 2016. "The effects of margin changes on commodity futures markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 129-152.
    8. Ito, Takatoshi & Lin, Wen-Ling, 2001. "Race to the center: competition for the Nikkei 225 futures trade," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 219-242, July.
    9. Stephen G Cecchetti & Jacob Gyntelberg & Marc Hollanders, 2009. "Central counterparties for over-the-counter derivatives," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, September.
    10. Rawley Z. Heimer & Alp Simsek, 2017. "Should Retail Investors' Leverage Be Limited?," NBER Working Papers 24176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Hsu, Yenshan, 1996. "Margin requirements and stock market volatility Another look at the case of Taiwan," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 409-419, December.
    12. Toshiaki Watanabe, 2002. "Margin requirements, positive feedback trading, and stock return autocorrelations: the case of Japan," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(6), pages 395-403.
    13. Massimiliano Affinito & Matteo Piazza, 2018. "Always look on the bright side? Central counterparties and interbank markets during the financial crisis," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1181, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    14. Jeffrey A. Frankel., 1992. "The Evolving Japanese Financial System, and the Cost of Capital," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C92-002, University of California at Berkeley.
    15. Zhang, Ting & Li, Honggang, 2013. "Buying on margin, selling short in an agent-based market model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 392(18), pages 4075-4082.
    16. Hsin, Chin-Wen & Guo, Wen-Chung & Tseng, Seng-Su & Luo, Wen-Chih, 2003. "The impact of speculative trading on stock return volatility: the evidence from Taiwan," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 243-270, December.
    17. Tyler Abbot, 2017. "General Equilibrium Under Convex Portfolio Constraints and Heterogeneous Risk Preferences," Papers 1706.05877, arXiv.org, revised Jun 2018.
    18. Sheng Guo, 2014. "Margin Requirements and Portfolio Optimization: A Geometric Approach," Working Papers 1406, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    19. Albert Menkveld & Emiliano Pagnotta & Marius Andrei Zoican, 2016. "Does Central Clearing Affect Price Stability? Evidence from Nordic Equity Markets," Working Papers hal-01253702, HAL.
    20. Heimer, Rawley & Simsek, Alp, 2019. "Should retail investors’ leverage be limited?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(3), pages 1-21.
    21. Chabakauri, Georgy, 2015. "Asset pricing with heterogeneous preferences, beliefs, and portfolio constraints," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 21-34.
    22. Chang, Eric C. & Luo, Yan & Ren, Jinjuan, 2014. "Short-selling, margin-trading, and price efficiency: Evidence from the Chinese market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 411-424.
    23. Domian, Dale L. & Racine, Marie D., 2006. "An empirical analysis of margin debt," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 151-163.

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