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Who Has Been Evicted and Why?

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew F. Haughwout
  • Haoyang Liu
  • Xiaohan Zhang

Abstract

More than two million American households are at risk of eviction every year. Evictions have been found to cause prolonged homelessness, worsened health conditions, and lack of credit access. During the COVID-19 outbreak, governments at all levels implemented eviction moratoriums to keep renters in their homes. As these moratoriums and enhanced income supports for unemployed workers come to an end, the possibility of a wave of evictions in the second half of the year is drawing increased attention. Despite the importance of evictions and related policies, very few economic studies have been done on this topic. With the exception of the Milwaukee Area Renters Study, evictions are rarely measured in economic surveys. To fill this gap, we conducted a novel national survey on evictions within the Housing Module of the Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE) in 2019 and 2020. This post describes our findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew F. Haughwout & Haoyang Liu & Xiaohan Zhang, 2020. "Who Has Been Evicted and Why?," Liberty Street Economics 20200708b, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednls:88326
    Note: Heterogeneity Series III: Credit Market Outcomes
    as

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    evictions; homeownership; credit access; diversity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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