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Where Are Manufacturing Jobs Coming Back?

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Abstract

As we outlined in our previous post, the United States lost close to sixmillion manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2010 but since then has gained back almost one million. In this post, we take a closer look at the geographic dimension of this modest rebound in manufacturing jobs. While job losses during the 2000s were fairly widespread across the country, manufacturing employment gains since then have been concentrated in particular parts of the country. Indeed, these gains were especially large in ?auto alley??a narrow motor vehicle production corridor stretching from Michigan south to Alabama?while much of the Northeast continued to shed manufacturing jobs. Closer to home, many of the metropolitan areas in the New York-Northern New Jersey region have been left out of this rebound and are continuing to shed manufacturing jobs, though Albany has bucked this trend with one of the strongest performances in the country.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaison R. Abel & Richard Deitz, 2019. "Where Are Manufacturing Jobs Coming Back?," Liberty Street Economics 20190206b, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednls:87310
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    File URL: https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2019/02/where-are-manufacturing-jobs-coming-back.html
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    Keywords

    employment; auto alley; new york; manufacturing;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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