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Interest rates and prices in the long run: a study of the Gibson paradox

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  • Thomas J. Sargent

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  • Thomas J. Sargent, 1971. "Interest rates and prices in the long run: a study of the Gibson paradox," Working Papers 75, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmwp:75
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    Cited by:

    1. Zijp, R. van & Visser, H., 1992. "Mathematical formalization and the analysis of Cantillon effects," Serie Research Memoranda 0002, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    2. Jan Kodera & Karel Sladký & Miloslav Vošvrda, 2007. "Neokeynesian and Neoclassical Macroeconomic Models: Stability and Lyapunov Experiments," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 1(3), pages 302-311, November.
    3. Dr Ferda Halicioglou, 2004. "The Gibson Paradox: An Empirical Investigation for Turkey," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(1-2), pages 111-120.
    4. Tak-Kuen Siu & Wai-Ki Ching & Eric Fung & Michael Ng, 2007. "Extracting Information from Spot Interest Rates and Credit Ratings using Double Higher-Order Hidden Markov Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 29(3), pages 425-425, May.
    5. Zijp, Rudy van, 1994. "Rationality and the Gibson Paradox : Sargent's early work as a quest for consistency," Serie Research Memoranda 0051, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    6. Eric M. Leeper & Jennifer E. Roush, 2003. "Putting "M" back in monetary policy," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1217-1264.
    7. John Y. Campbell, 1986. "Bond and Stock Returns in a Simple Exchange Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 101(4), pages 785-803.
    8. Zhao, Guo, 2014. "Dynamic Production Theory under No-arbitrage Constraints," MPRA Paper 65166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Barsky, Robert B., 1987. "The Fisher hypothesis and the forecastability and persistence of inflation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 3-24, January.
    10. Barsky, Robert B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Gibson's Paradox and the Gold Standard," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(3), pages 528-550, June.
    11. Cihan Yalcin & Gulbin Sahinbeyoglu, 2000. "The Term Structure of Interest Rates : Does It Tell About Future Inflation," Discussion Papers 0002, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    12. Chadha, Jagjit S. & Perlman, Morris, 2014. "Was the Gibson Paradox for real? A Wicksellian study of the relationship between interest rates and prices," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(02), pages 139-163, August.
    13. Dario Cziráky & Max Gillman, 2006. "Money Demand in an EU Accession Country: A VECM Study of Croatia," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 105-127, April.
    14. Coulombe, Serge, 1998. "A Non-Paradoxical Interpretation of the Gibson Paradox," Staff Working Papers 98-22, Bank of Canada.
    15. Binder, Carola Conces, 2016. "Estimation of historical inflation expectations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-31.
    16. Robert B. Barsky & J. Bradford De Long, 1988. "Forecasting Pre-World War I Inflation: The Fisher Effect Revisited," NBER Working Papers 2784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Paul Evans & Xiaojun Wang, 2008. "A Tale of Two Effects," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 147-157, February.
    18. Flaschel, Peter & Sethi, Rajiv, 1996. "Classical dynamics in a general model of the Keynes-Wicksell type," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 401-428, December.
    19. Carl Chiarella & Peter Flaschel, 1999. "Disequilibrium Growth Theory: Foundations, Synthesis, Perspectives," Working Paper Series 85, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    20. Zijp, R. van, 1991. "The rise of new classical economics," Serie Research Memoranda 0077, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    21. Daniel Kaufmann, 2016. "Is Deflation Costly After All? Evidence from Noisy Historical Data," KOF Working papers 16-421, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.

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    Keywords

    Interest rates;

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