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Globalization of financial institutions: evidence from cross-border banking performance


  • Allen N. Berger
  • Robert DeYoung
  • Hesna Genay
  • Gregory F. Udell


We address the causes, consequences, and implications of the cross-border consolidation of financial institutions by reviewing several hundred studies, providing comparative international data, and estimating cross-border banking efficiency in France, Germany, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S. during the 1990s. We find that, on average, domestic banks have higher profit efficiency than foreign banks. However, banks from at least one country (the U.S.) appear to operate with relatively high efficiency both at home and abroad. If these results continue to hold, they do not preclude successful international expansion by some financial firms, but they do suggest limits to global consolidation.

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  • Allen N. Berger & Robert DeYoung & Hesna Genay & Gregory F. Udell, 2000. "Globalization of financial institutions: evidence from cross-border banking performance," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-04, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2000-04

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    15. repec:fth:harver:1490 is not listed on IDEAS
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    International finance ; Banks and banking; International ; Bank mergers;

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