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The labour Augmented K+S model : a laboratory for the analysis of institutional and policy regimes

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Dosi

    (Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy)

  • M.C. Pereira

    (Institute of Economics, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil, and Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy)

  • Andrea Roventini

    (Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy and OFCE, Sciences Po, Paris France)

  • M. E. Virgillito

    (Institute of Economic Policy, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy, & Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy)

Abstract

In this work we discuss the research findings from the labour-augmented Schumpeter meeting Keynes (K+S) agent-based model. It comprises comparative dynamics experiments on an artificial economy populated by heterogeneous, interacting agents, as workers, firms, banks and the government. The exercises are characterised by different degrees of labour flexibility, or by institutional shocks entailing labour market structural reforms, wherein the phenomenon of hysteresis is endogenous and pervasive. The K+S model constitutes a laboratory to evaluate the effects of new institutional arrangements as active/passive labour market policies, and fiscal austerity. In this perspective, the model allows mimicking many of the customary policy responses which the European Union and many Latin American countries have embraced in reaction to the recent economic crises. The obtained results seem to indicate, however, that most of the proposed policies are likely inadequate to tackle the short-term crises consequences, and even risk demoting the long-run economic prospects. More objectively, the conclusions offer a possible explanation to the negative path traversed by economies like Brazil, where many of the mentioned policies were applied in a short period, and hint about some risks ahead.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Dosi & M.C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & M. E. Virgillito, 2018. "The labour Augmented K+S model : a laboratory for the analysis of institutional and policy regimes," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2018-27, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  • Handle: RePEc:fce:doctra:1827
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour market; Policy evaluation; Agent-based model;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • J88 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Public Policy

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