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Personal Earnings Inequality in the Czech Republic



This paper analyzes the inequality of personal earnings in the Czech Republic since the early transition from communism, using relative distribution method. It applies data from two surveys, Microcensus and Living Conditions, covering the period from 1988 to 2008. The trend suggested by many recent empirics, “hollowing of the middle”, was confirmed in the early stages of transition, but later subsided. Earnings polarization was apparent for all sex and education subgroups between the years 1988 and 1996. For international comparison the European dataset EU-SILC 2008 has been used, focusing on four countries: Austria, Germany, Hungary, and Poland. Earnings distributions by gender and education have been analyzed, establishing that male earnings distribution is more homogenous than female, and earnings of highly educated people are more concentrated in the middle than earnings of less educated people.

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  • Martina Mysíková, 2011. "Personal Earnings Inequality in the Czech Republic," Working Papers IES 2011/11, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Apr 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:wpaper:wp2011_11

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Kahanec & M. Guzi & M. Martišková & M. Paleník & F. Pertold & Z. Siebertová, 2012. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in the Czech Republic and Slovakia," GINI Country Reports czech_slovak, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.

    More about this item


    earnings distribution; inequality; transition;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J39 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Other
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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