IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fam/rpseri/rp6.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Systematic Patterns Before and After Large Price Changes: Evidence from High Frequency Data from the Paris Bourse

Author

Listed:
  • Foort HAMELINK

    (Tilburg University)

Abstract

This paper examines the intra-day behavior of asset prices shortly before and after large price changes. Whereas similar studies so far have been based on daily closing prices, I use three years of high frequency data of 120 stocks listed on the French stock exchange. Various systematic patterns, in addition to those often reported in the literature, emerge from this data. Evidence is found that prices do overreact and that a correction takes place after large price movements, especially those on the downside. The correction does not take place immediately after the large price change. Prior to this, some very significant and sometimes economically important patterns can be observed. When the bid-ask spread is taken into account, I still find some ex-post profitable trading strategies that are, however, too small in magnitude to suggest market inefficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Foort HAMELINK, 1999. "Systematic Patterns Before and After Large Price Changes: Evidence from High Frequency Data from the Paris Bourse," FAME Research Paper Series rp6, International Center for Financial Asset Management and Engineering.
  • Handle: RePEc:fam:rpseri:rp6
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.swissfinanceinstitute.ch/rp6.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dubin, Robin A, 1988. "Estimation of Regression Coefficients in the Presence of Spatially Autocorrelated Error Terms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(3), pages 466-474, August.
    2. Bourassa, Steven C. & Hamelink, Foort & Hoesli, Martin & MacGregor, Bryan D., 1999. "Defining Housing Submarkets," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 160-183, June.
    3. Dubin, Robin A, 1998. "Predicting House Prices Using Multiple Listings Data," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 35-59, July.
    4. Can, Ayse, 1992. "Specification and estimation of hedonic housing price models," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 453-474, September.
    5. Basu, Sabyasachi & Thibodeau, Thomas G, 1998. "Analysis of Spatial Autocorrelation in House Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 61-85, July.
    6. Colwell, Peter F, 1998. "A Primer on Piecewise Parabolic Multiple Regression Analysis via Estimations of Chicago CBD Land Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 87-97, July.
    7. Pace, R Kelley & Gilley, Otis W, 1997. "Using the Spatial Configuration of the Data to Improve Estimation," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 333-340, May.
    8. Clapp, John M, 2003. "A Semiparametric Method for Valuing Residential Locations: Application to Automated Valuation," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 303-320, November.
    9. A. F. Militino & M. D. Ugarte & L. GarcĂ­a-Reinaldos, 2004. "Alternative Models for Describing Spatial Dependence among Dwelling Selling Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 193-209, September.
    10. R. Kelley Pace & James P. LeSage, 2004. "Spatial Statistics and Real Estate," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 147-148, September.
    11. Clapp, John M & Rodriguez, Mauricio, 1999. "Erratum: Spatiotemporal Autoregressive Models of Neighborhood Effects," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 1-85, July.
    12. Bradford Case & John Clapp & Robin Dubin & Mauricio Rodriguez, 2004. "Modeling Spatial and Temporal House Price Patterns: A Comparison of Four Models," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 167-191, September.
    13. Timothy J. Fik & David C. Ling & Gordon F. Mulligan, 2003. "Modeling Spatial Variation in Housing Prices: A Variable Interaction Approach," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(4), pages 623-646, December.
    14. L. Randall Wray & Stephanie Bell, 2004. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Credit and State Theories of Money, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Can, Ayse & Megbolugbe, Isaac, 1997. "Spatial Dependence and House Price Index Construction," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(1-2), pages 203-222, Jan.-Marc.
    16. Philippe Robert-Demontrond & R. Ringoot, 2004. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00081823, HAL.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:rmk:rmkjrc:v:4:y:2017:i:1:p:71-101 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    predictable patterns; large price changes; high frequency data.;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fam:rpseri:rp6. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marilyn Barja). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fameech.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.