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In Search of Food Security: Addressing Opacity and Price Volatility in ASEAN's Rice Sector


  • Sally Trethewie


The availability of rice has long been considered a key indicator of food security in Southeast Asia. However for largely strategic reasons there is paucity of information in the public domain on rice availability, particularly figures on production, storage and trade. As a consequence, households, producers, mills and traders participating in the market have been doing so based on opaque information, and this has had significant impact on rice price information. When price shocks and volatility occur, the ramifications of trading with insufficient data are magnified. This paper recommends four measures that Southeast Asian governments might take to increase tranparency, and thus address the continuing problem of price volatility. [Policy Brief No.15]. URL:[].

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  • Sally Trethewie, 2012. "In Search of Food Security: Addressing Opacity and Price Volatility in ASEAN's Rice Sector," Working Papers id:4876, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4876 Note: Institutional Papers

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Toman, Michael & Krautkraemer, Jeffrey, 2003. "Fundamental Economics of Depletable Energy Supply," Discussion Papers dp-03-01, Resources For the Future.
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    6. Todd Moss, 2011. "Oil to Cash: Fighting the Resource Curse through Cash Transfers," Working Papers id:3489, eSocialSciences.
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    food security; southeast Asia; rice; ASEAN; WTO;


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