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What Determines the Diffusion of ICT at Firm Level?

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  • Haller, Stefanie
  • Siedschlag, Iulia

Abstract

Empirical evidence indicates that the diffusion of ICT has been uneven across firms, industries, regions and countries. From the policy perspective, to the extent that a wide and fast diffusion of ICT is desirable, it is essential to understand what factors are likely to influence the diffusion of ICT. New technologies are adopted at different dates and speed depending on firm characteristics and the characteristics of the environment in which firms operate. To understand the diffusion of ICT as a new technology it is essential to uncover the factors that explain the variation in the rates of its adoption and use across firms, industries, regions and countries.
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Suggested Citation

  • Haller, Stefanie & Siedschlag, Iulia, 2012. "What Determines the Diffusion of ICT at Firm Level?," Papers RB2012/1/1, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:rb2012/1/1
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