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Do parents affect the early political prioritisation of nature in their children?


  • Pettifor, Hazel


This study is concerned with the roots of environmentalism in young people in Britain and in particular the role parents play in the formation of deep green political attitudes in their children. Using a series of multiple logistic regressions on a pooled sample of children aged 11 to 16 (n=6,590) it is observed that compared to any other political party the odds of a child choosing the Green Party are greater if the father or the mother is also partisan to the green party. Contrary to other empirical research there is no significant difference found between the size of the effects of mothers and fathers on their children and provided the parent is more likely to be politically aligned with ideals of ecologism, this study observes an increased probability in their children’s choice of the Green Party compared to the average child.

Suggested Citation

  • Pettifor, Hazel, 2012. "Do parents affect the early political prioritisation of nature in their children?," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2012-11

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