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State Fragility, The Peacebuilder'S Contract, And The Search For The Least Bad State

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  • Michael Barnett

Abstract

This paper develops two claims that follow from two general conclusions from recent re-search on peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. The first is that international peacebuilders are fairly good at ending violence and at producing stability, but are less talented at creating liberal states. In order to understand why, Section I develops the concept of the peacebuilders' contract, which is intended to map the kinds of strategic interactions that are likely to unfold between peacebuilders and local élites and capture why these interactions are likely to favour the status quo preferred by local forces. Fol-lowing on the general recognition that international peacebuilders are limited in what they can produce, the second conclusion concerns the need for peacebuilders to be more strategic in their thinking and to be satisfied with producing small victories that can sup-port the emergence of decent governments which provide the foundations for future movements towards a positive peace. These observations and their implications are ap-plicable not only to post-war interventions, but also to the broader international agenda of fixing states.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Barnett, 2010. "State Fragility, The Peacebuilder'S Contract, And The Search For The Least Bad State," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 14, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
  • Handle: RePEc:erp:euirsc:p0235
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