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Measuring The Changing Generosity Of Unemployment Benefits: Beyond Existing Indicators

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  • GAYLE ALLARD

    () (Instituto de Empresa)

Abstract

There has long been a consensus that generous unemployment benefits probably raise unemployment rates.The link has been difficult to demonstrate, since existing indicators on the generosity of unemployment benefits overlook key aspects of the system that may influence worker response.The author develops a new indicator for unemployment benefits in 21 countries in the 1950-2003 time period which combines the amount of the subsidy with their tax treatment, their duration and the conditions that must be met in order to collect them.The new indicator shows that benefit generosity has indeed risen over time and differs greatly among countries, opening up future directions for empirical research.

Suggested Citation

  • Gayle Allard, 2005. "Measuring The Changing Generosity Of Unemployment Benefits: Beyond Existing Indicators," Working Papers Economia wp05-18, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
  • Handle: RePEc:emp:wpaper:wp05-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bertola, Giuseppe & Rogerson, Richard, 1997. "Institutions and labor reallocation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 1147-1171, June.
    2. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    3. Edward P. Lazear, 1990. "Job Security Provisions and Employment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 699-726.
    4. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    5. John P Martin, 1998. "What Works Among Active Labour Market Policies: Evidence from OECD Countries' Experiences," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Guy Debelle & Jeff Borland (ed.), Unemployment and the Australian Labour Market Reserve Bank of Australia.
    6. Boeri, Tito, 1999. "Enforcement of employment security regulations, on-the-job search and unemployment duration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 65-89, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Flaig Gebhard & Rottmann Horst, 2009. "Labour Market Institutions and the Employment Intensity of Output Growth," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(1), pages 22-35, February.
    2. Guilloux, S. & Kharroubi, E., 2008. "Some Preliminary Evidence on the Globalization-Inflation Nexus," Working papers 195, Banque de France.
    3. Sergio Destefanis & Giuseppe Mastromatteo, 2016. "The Beveridge Curve in the OECD. Before and after the great recession," Working Papers 5, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    4. Pallage, Stéphane & Scruggs, Lyle & Zimmermann, Christian, 2013. "Measuring Unemployment Insurance Generosity," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(04), pages 524-549, September.
    5. Eichhorst, Werner & Feil, Michael & Braun, Christoph, 2008. "What have we learned? Assessing labor market institutions and indicators," IAB Discussion Paper 200822, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Rottmann, Horst & Flaig, Gebhard, 2011. "Labour market institutions and unemployment: An international comparison," Weidener Diskussionspapiere 31, University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden (OTH).
    7. Sergio Destefanis & Giuseppe Mastromatteo, 2015. "The Beveridge Curve in the OECD Before and After the Crisis," Discussion Papers 4_2015, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    8. Rottmann, Horst & Flaig, Gebhard, 2009. "Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen und die langfristige Entwicklung der Arbeitslosigkeit: Empirische Ergebnisse für 19 OECD-Länder," Weidener Diskussionspapiere 17, University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden (OTH).

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