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Does the Effect of Pollution on Infant Mortality Differ Between Developed and Developing Countries? Evidence from Mexico City

Author

Listed:
  • Eva Olimpia Arceo Gómez

    () (Division of Economics, CIDE)

  • Rema Hanna
  • Paulina Oliva

Abstract

Most estimates of the relationship between pollution and mortality come from developed country data. However, these may not be externally valid to the developing world. Using data from Mexico, we find that an increase of 1 parts per billion in carbon monoxide (CO) results in 0.0032 infant deaths per 100,000 births, while a 1 µg/m3 increase in particulate matter (PM10) results in 0.24 deaths. Our estimates for PM10 tend to be similar than the U.S. estimates, while our findings on CO tend to be larger. We provide suggestive evidence non-linearities in the relationship between CO and health explains this difference.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Olimpia Arceo Gómez & Rema Hanna & Paulina Oliva, 2012. "Does the Effect of Pollution on Infant Mortality Differ Between Developed and Developing Countries? Evidence from Mexico City," Working papers DTE 546, CIDE, División de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:emc:wpaper:dte546
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    File URL: http://cide.edu/repec/economia/pdf/DTE546.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanis, Eleftherios & Ozdamar, Oznur, 2014. "The effects of Air Pollution on Health Status in Great Britain," MPRA Paper 59988, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Montag, Josef, 2015. "The simple economics of motor vehicle pollution: A case for fuel tax," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 138-149.
    3. Rema Hanna & Esther Duflo & Michael Greenstone, 2016. "Up in Smoke: The Influence of Household Behavior on the Long-Run Impact of Improved Cooking Stoves," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 80-114, February.
    4. Avraham Ebenstein & Maoyong Fan & Michael Greenstone & Guojun He & Peng Yin & Maigeng Zhou, 2015. "Growth, Pollution, and Life Expectancy: China from 1991-2012," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(5), pages 226-231, May.
    5. Prashant Bharadwaj & Matthew Gibson & Joshua Graff Zivin & Christopher Neilson, 2017. "Gray Matters: Fetal Pollution Exposure and Human Capital Formation," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 505-542.
    6. Douglas Almond & Janet Currie & Valentina Duque, 2017. "Childhood Circumstances and Adult Outcomes: Act II," NBER Working Papers 23017, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. He, Guojun & Fan, Maoyong & Zhou, Maigeng, 2016. "The effect of air pollution on mortality in China: Evidence from the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 18-39.
    8. Emilio Gutierrez, 2015. "Air quality and infant mortality in Mexico: evidence from variation in pollution concentrations caused by the usage of small-scale power plants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 1181-1207, October.
    9. Massimo Filippini & Adán L. Martínez-Cruz, 2016. "Impact of environmental and social attitudes, and family concerns on willingness to pay for improved air quality: a contingent valuation application in Mexico City," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 25(1), pages 1-18, December.
    10. Tanaka, Shinsuke, 2015. "Environmental regulations on air pollution in China and their impact on infant mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 90-103.
    11. Lopamudra Chakraborti & David Ricardo Heres & Danae Hernández Cortés, 2016. "Are Land Values Related to Ambiet Air Pollution Levels? Hedonic Evidence from Mexico City," Working papers DTE 596, CIDE, División de Economía.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Developed Countries; Developing Countries; Pollution effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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