IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/egc/wpaper/958.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Country Patterns of Behavior on Broader Dimensions

Author

Listed:
  • Gustav Ranis

    () (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)

  • Frances Stewart

    () (Oxford University)

  • Emma Samman

    () (Oxford University)

Abstract

This paper adopts a more expansive definition of Human Development than that encompassed by the Human Development Index in order to explore diverse country patterns of behavior in relation to these broadened dimensions. We proceed by first identifying the dimensions to be investigated and subsequently present the methodology adopted for clarifying country behavior with respect to these dimensions. Countries are shown to differ substantially in terms of their choices among the independent dimensions of well-being which may or may not be constrained by history or culture. We then group countries by level of per capita income, experience with internal conflict, region of the world, oil, wealth, distance from the equator, distance from the sea, in the search for identifiable differential behavior patterns by country typology. We find that choices do exist across the board. For example, even low income countries can achieve well in all categories while high income countries do poorly.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustav Ranis & Frances Stewart & Emma Samman, 2007. "Country Patterns of Behavior on Broader Dimensions," Working Papers 958, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:958
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp958.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eduardo Engel & Ronald Fischer & Alexander Galetovic, 2013. "The Basic Public Finance Of Public–Private Partnerships," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 83-111, February.
    2. Salant, Stephen W, 1995. "The Economics of Natural Resource Extraction: A Primer for Development Economists," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 93-111, February.
    3. Petter Osmundsen, 1998. "Dynamic Taxation of Non-renewable Natural Resources Under Asymmetric Information About Reserves," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(4), pages 933-951, November.
    4. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Fisher, Anthony C, 1981. "Hotelling's "Economics of Exhaustible Resources": Fifty Years Later," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 65-73.
    5. Heaps, Terry & Helliwell, John F., 1985. "The taxation of natural resources," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 421-472 Elsevier.
    6. Robert T. Deacon & Henning Bohn, 2000. "Ownership Risk, Investment, and the Use of Natural Resources," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 526-549.
    7. Eduardo M. R. A. Engel & Ronald D. Fischer & Alexander Galetovic, 2001. "Least-Present-Value-of-Revenue Auctions and Highway Franchising," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(5), pages 993-1020, October.
    8. Boadway, Robin & Flatters, Frank, 1993. "The taxation of natural resources : principles and policy issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1210, The World Bank.
    9. Bohn, Henning & Deacon, Robert, 1997. "Ownership Risk, Investment, and the Use of Natural Resources," Discussion Papers dp-97-20, Resources For the Future.
    10. Fraser, Rob & Kingwell, Ross, 1997. "Can expected tax revenue be increased by an investment-preserving switch from ad valorem royalties to a resource rent tax?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, pages 103-108.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gustav Ranis, 2009. "Economics, Area Studies and Human Development," Working Papers 975, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Development; Quality of Life; Happiness; Capabilities; Country Behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:958. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Louise Danishevsky). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/egyalus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.