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Ramsey Fiscal And Monetary Policy Under Sticky Prices And Liquid Bonds



We construct a monetary model where government bonds also provide liquidity service. Liquid government bonds affect equilibrium allocations, inflation and create an endogenous interest-rate spread. How this new feature alters optimal fiscal-monetary policy in a stochastic sticky-price environment is considered. The tradeoff confronting a planner, shown in recent literature, between using inflation surprise and labor-income tax is eradicated by the existence of the liquid bond. We find that the more sticky prices become, the more the planner stabilizes prices, but the planner also creates less distortionary and less volatile income taxes by resorting to taxing the liquidity service of bonds.

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  • Yifan Hu & Timothy Kam, 2005. "Ramsey Fiscal And Monetary Policy Under Sticky Prices And Liquid Bonds," CAMA Working Papers 2005-25, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:camaaa:2005-25

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    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy


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