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Market Response Analysis: The Demand System versus Non-Restricted Marketing Models

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  • Tie Wang

Abstract

There are different views on the specifications of market share models between economists and marketing researchers. The paper made a multi-criteria comparison between the two well-known demand system models, the AIDS and Translog model that are subject to the symmetry and homogeneity restrictions, and the two-market response models in which the symmetry and homogeneity restrictions are not imposed. The results indicate that the two-market response models outperform the two demand system models. This implies some underlying assumptions on which the demand models are derived are not satisfied for the Australian domestic meat market

Suggested Citation

  • Tie Wang, 2004. "Market Response Analysis: The Demand System versus Non-Restricted Marketing Models," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 116, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:ausm04:116
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Keywords: Model Comparisons; Demand System; Market Share; Market Response Model.;

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation

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