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The Household, Time Use and the Sharing Rule


  • Ray Rees
  • Robert Breunig
  • Patricia Apps


This paper sets out a theoretical framework for models of the household production and labour supply decisions of families, and estimates empirical specifications on time use survey data containing information on labour supply, domestic work and pure leisure. The models are then compared with the standard household model estimated on household survey data containing information on time allocated to labour supply alone. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate, both theoretically and empirically, that the “income pooling hypothesis� of the standard model cannot be tested on household survey data of this kind. Due to missing information on individual consumptions, including pure leisure, these data allow only the implied aggregation restrictions of the model to be tested. Nor can individual preference parameters, or the parameters of a sharing rule, be identified unless the empirical specification imposes some essentially arbitrary assumption. The study goes on to examine the gender implications and implied child costs of various assumptions that have been introduced in the literature on modeling multi-person househol

Suggested Citation

  • Ray Rees & Robert Breunig & Patricia Apps, 2004. "The Household, Time Use and the Sharing Rule," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 101, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:ausm04:101

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ruiz, Esther & Pascual, Lorenzo, 2002. " Bootstrapping Financial Time Series," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 271-300, July.
    2. Wright, Jonathan H, 2000. "Alternative Variance-Ratio Tests Using Ranks and Signs," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 18(1), pages 1-9, January.
    3. Pan, Ming-Shiun & Chan, Kam C. & C.W. Fok, Robert, 1997. "Do currency futures prices follow random walks?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, January.
    4. Whang, Yoon-Jae & Kim, Jinho, 2003. "A multiple variance ratio test using subsampling," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 225-230, May.
    5. Richardson, Matthew & Smith, Tom, 1991. "Tests of Financial Models in the Presence of Overlapping Observations," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 4(2), pages 227-254.
    6. Yilmaz, Kamil, 2003. "Martingale Property of Exchange Rates and Central Bank Interventions," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 21(3), pages 383-395, July.
    7. Hyun-Jung Ryoo & Graham Smith, 2002. "Korean stock prices under price limits: variance ratio tests of random walks," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(8), pages 545-553.
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    More about this item


    multi-person households; labour supply; household production; sharing rule;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household


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