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Selling Failed Banks

Author

Listed:
  • Granja, Joao

    (MIT)

  • Matvos, Gregor

    (University of Chicago)

  • Seru, Amit

    (University of Chicago)

Abstract

We show that the allocation of failed banks in the Great Recession was likely distorted because potential acquirers of these banks were poorly capitalized. We illustrate this phenomenon within a model of auctions with budget constraints. In our model poor capitalization of some potential acquirers drives a wedge between their willingness to pay and the ability to pay for a failed bank. Using our framework, we infer three characteristics that drive potential acquirers' willingness to pay for a failed bank in the data: geographic proximity, bank specialization, and increased market concentration. Consistent with predictions of our model, we find that low capitalization of potential acquirers decreases their ability to acquire a failed bank. Finally, we show that the wedge between potential acquirers' willingness and ability to pay distorts the allocation of failed banks. The costs of this misallocation are substantial, as measured by the additional resolution costs of the FDIC. These findings have direct implications for the design of the bank resolution process.

Suggested Citation

  • Granja, Joao & Matvos, Gregor & Seru, Amit, 2016. "Selling Failed Banks," Research Papers 3461, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:3461
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1992. " Liquidation Values and Debt Capacity: A Market Equilibrium Approach," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1343-1366, September.
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    4. Sumit Agarwal & David Lucca & Amit Seru & Francesco Trebbi, 2014. "Inconsistent Regulators: Evidence from Banking," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(2), pages 889-938.
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    6. James, Christopher & Wier, Peggy, 1987. "An analysis of FDIC failed bank auctions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 141-153, July.
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    9. Benjamin J. Keys & Amit Seru & Vikrant Vig, 2012. "Lender Screening and the Role of Securitization: Evidence from Prime and Subprime Mortgage Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 25(7), pages 2071-2108.
    10. Viral V. Acharya & Hyun Song Shin & Tanju Yorulmazer, 2011. "Crisis Resolution and Bank Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(6), pages 2166-2205.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Corbae, Dean & D'Erasmo, Pablo, 2014. "Capital requirements in a quantitative model of banking industry dynamics," Working Papers 14-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. repec:eee:jfinec:v:130:y:2018:i:3:p:453-483 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Raghuram G. Rajan & Rodney Ramcharan, 2016. "Constituencies and Legislation: The Fight Over the McFadden Act of 1927," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(7), pages 1843-1859, July.
    4. Rampini, Adriano A. & Viswanathan, S. & Vuillemey, Guillaume, 2019. "Risk Management in Financial Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 13787, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Jason Allen & Robert Clark & Brent Hickman & Eric Richert, 2019. "Resolving Failed Banks: Uncertainty, Multiple Bidding & Auction Design," Staff Working Papers 19-30, Bank of Canada.
    6. Buchak, Greg & Matvos, Gregor & Piskorski, Tomasz & Seru, Amit, 2018. "Fintech, regulatory arbitrage, and the rise of shadow banks," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(3), pages 453-483.
    7. repec:oup:rcorpf:v:5:y:2016:i:1:p:76-101. is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Igan, Deniz & Lambert, Thomas & Wagner, Wolf & Zhang, Quxian, 2017. "Winning Connections? Special Interests and the Sale of Failed Banks," CEPR Discussion Papers 12440, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. repec:rnp:ecopol:ep1707 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:finsta:v:30:y:2017:i:c:p:229-239 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Kostrov, Alexander & Mamonov, Mikhail, 2019. "The formation of hidden negative capital in banking : A product mismatch hypothesis," BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2019, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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