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General Hamilton and Dr. Smith

Author

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  • Scherer, F. M.

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

In 1791 Alexander Hamilton submitted as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury a now-famous Report on the Subject of Manufactures. In it he criticized arguments that the U.S. colonies should remain preponderantly agricultural. He does not name the "respectable patrons of opinions" whose views he was contradicting. This paper attempts to clear up the identity mystery.

Suggested Citation

  • Scherer, F. M., 2012. "General Hamilton and Dr. Smith," Working Paper Series rwp12-029, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp12-029
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