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Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale

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  • Hadley, Constance Noonan

    (Harvard University)

  • Pittinsky, Todd L.

    (Harvard University)

  • Sommer, S. Amy

    (Harvard University)

  • Zhu, Weichun

    (Claremont McKenna College)

Abstract

Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and safety crisis. In Studies 1 and 2, we find that C-LEAD predicts decision-making difficulty and confidence in a crisis better than a measure of general leadership efficacy. In Study 3, C-LEAD predicts greater motivation to lead in a crisis, more crisis leader role-taking, and more accurate performance while in a crisis leader role. These findings support the scale's construct validity and broaden our theoretical understanding of the nature of crisis leader efficacy.

Suggested Citation

  • Hadley, Constance Noonan & Pittinsky, Todd L. & Sommer, S. Amy & Zhu, Weichun, 2009. "Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale," Working Paper Series rwp09-021, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp09-021
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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