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The WTO’s Doha Negotiations : An Assessment


  • Bhagirath Lal Das



The lure of big benefits from successful conclusion of the multilateral negotiations and the risks of bilateral and regional routes if these negotiations fail should not be taken by the developing countries as determining factors in their moves in the current WTO Doha negotiations. Working together, the developing countries have much greater negotiating strength than if they were to form small interest groups and negotiate with the major developed countries separately. Such cohesion of strength and strategy can be built up on the basis of mutual trust and recognition of various interests among them. If there are conflicting interests sometimes, there would be a need for rational adjustment. Total transparency among the developing countries and being continuously on guard against mutual suspicion are important preconditions for deepening their cooperation and consolidation in multilateral negotiations.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhagirath Lal Das, 2008. "The WTO’s Doha Negotiations : An Assessment," Trade Working Papers 22096, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:tradew:22096

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David L. Hummels & Georg Schaur, 2013. "Time as a Trade Barrier," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(7), pages 2935-2959, December.
    2. David Hummels & Alexandre Skiba, 2004. "Shipping the Good Apples Out? An Empirical Confirmation of the Alchian-Allen Conjecture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(6), pages 1384-1402, December.
    3. Limao, Nuno & Venables, Anthony J., 1999. "Infrastructure, geographical disadvantage, and transport costs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2257, The World Bank.
    4. De, Prabir, 2006. "Trade, Infrastructure and Transaction Costs: The Imperatives for Asian Economic Cooperation," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 21, pages 708-735.
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    More about this item


    WTO; Doha; assesment; developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation


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