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Press Freedom, Human Capital and Corruption


  • Rudiger Ahrend


In this paper we investigate the relationship between corruption, human capital, and the monitoring capacities of civil society, as proxied for example by press freedom and an independent judicial system. In a theoretical model we find the impact of education on corruption to depend on the capacities of civil society to oversee government officials. If those capacities are well developed, education decreases corruption, whereas it may lead to higher corruption if civil monitoring is low. We find empirical evidence to support this result for secondary and higher education. Furthermore we investigate the direct relation between corruption and press freedom. We find no evidence that corruption negatively affects press freedom. We find, however, strong empirical evidence that a lack of press freedom leads to higher levels of corruption. This implies that strengthening press freedom should be among the priorities in the fight against corruption.

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  • Rudiger Ahrend, 2002. "Press Freedom, Human Capital and Corruption," DELTA Working Papers 2002-11, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  • Handle: RePEc:del:abcdef:2002-11

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    1. Holly, Alberto & Gardiol, Lucien & Domenighetti, Gianfranco & Brigitte Bisig, 1998. "An econometric model of health care utilization and health insurance in Switzerland," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 513-522, May.
    2. Ma, Ching-to Albert & McGuire, Thomas G, 1997. "Optimal Health Insurance and Provider Payment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 685-704, September.
    3. McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Physician agency," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 461-536 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Leigh, 2009. "Does the World Economy Swing National Elections?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(2), pages 163-181, April.
    2. Kalenborn, Christine & Lessmann, Christian, 2013. "The impact of democracy and press freedom on corruption: Conditionality matters," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 857-886.
    3. Rudiger Ahrend & Carlos Winograd, 2006. "The political economy of mass privatisation and imperfect taxation: Winners and loosers," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 201-224, January.
    4. Joseph-François Cabral, 2013. "Corruption, croissance et pauvreté : le cas du Sénégal," Cahiers de recherche 13-03, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    5. De Rosa, Donato & Iootty, Mariana, 2012. "Are natural resources cursed ? an investigation of the dynamic effects of resource dependence on institutional quality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6151, The World Bank.

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