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Is Corporate R&D Investment in High-Tech Sectors More Effective?

Author

Listed:
  • Raquel Ortega-Argilés

    () (European Commission, Joint Research Center (JRC), Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS))

  • Mariacristina Piva

    () (DISCE, Università Cattolica)

  • Lesley Potters

    () (European Commission, Joint Research Center (JRC), Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS))

  • Marco Vivarelli

    () (DISCE, Università Cattolica)

Abstract

This paper discusses the link between R&D and productivity across the European industrial and service sectors. The empirical analysis is based on both the European sectoral OECD data and on a unique micro longitudinal database consisting of 532 top European R&D investors. The main conclusions are as follows. First, the R&D stock has a significant positive impact on labour productivity; this general result is largely consistent with previous literature in terms of the sign, the significance and the magnitude of the estimated coefficients. More interestingly, both at sectoral and firm levels the R&D coefficient increases monotonically (both in significance and magnitude) when we move from the low-tech to the medium and high-tech sectors. This outcome means that corporate R&D investment is more effective in the high-tech sectors and this may need to be taken into account when designing policy instruments (subsidies, fiscal incentives, etc.) in support of private R&D. However, R&D investment is not the sole source of productivity gains; technological change embodied in gross investment is of comparable importance on aggregate and is the main determinant of productivity increase in the low-tech sectors. Hence, an economic policy aiming to increase productivity in the low-tech sectors should support overall capital formation.

Suggested Citation

  • Raquel Ortega-Argilés & Mariacristina Piva & Lesley Potters & Marco Vivarelli, 2009. "Is Corporate R&D Investment in High-Tech Sectors More Effective?," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali dises0955, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctc:serie2:dises0955
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laure Turner & Hervé Boulhol, 2008. "Recent Trends and Structural Breaks in US and EU15 Labour Productivity Growth," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 628, OECD Publishing.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    R&D; productivity; high-tech sectors; innovation; industrial policy;

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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