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Services Trade Liberalisation


  • Motoshige Itoh
  • Naoki Shimoi


This paper deals with the role of human development and technology in trade in services, the significance of trade in services, and the importance of investment in human resource development. It also outlines the requirements for promoting personnel training and the need for advanced technology. The authors begin by describing what services are, before discussing how trade in services affects economic growth and the role of technology in the services sector. Next, they mention the importance of human capital in the services sector. They assume that the actions of regulatory authorities depend on the availability of human capital, so they refer to the relationship between trade in services and regulations. They also discuss the critical importance of investment for the improvement of human capital and the promotion of human development. The authors describe the impact of technology development in the service sector, and note especially that the improvement of information and communication technology (ICT) brings down costs and raises quality. They also note the role of the private sector in investing in ICT and networks, and the role of governments in creating investment-friendly environments. Finally, they comment on public policy before providing some concluding remarks.

Suggested Citation

  • Motoshige Itoh & Naoki Shimoi, 2003. "Services Trade Liberalisation," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 340, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:csg:ajrcau:340

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Elena Ianchovichina & Will Martin, 2004. "Impacts of China's Accession to the World Trade Organization," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(1), pages 3-27.
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    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations


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